DecryptedTech

Friday19 August 2022

Displaying items by tag: edge

In mid-1999 software and hardware developers uncovered a bug of sorts that, at first glance, seemed like it would end the computer world as we know it. It was called the Y2K bug and centered around the issue that somehow developers and built their code to with the first two digits of the year input field as hard coded to 19. This mean that when everything rolled over to year 2000, computers and software would see it as 1900. Not exactly where you want to be.

Published in In Other News

Firefox was once one of the leading “alternative” browsers on the internet. After the death of Netscape Firefox came along and offered people an alternative to the building Windows Internet Explorer and even to Safari on macOS. This trend continued into the mobile arena, at least until Google launched the Chrome Browser. Although Chrome had a bit of a rocky start (with clear indications of data collection), it has grown in popularity and gobble up about 64% of the browsing on the internet.

Published in Security Talk

The current threat landscape has user account compromise and endpoint takeover as the most common first acts in a security event. The methods used to accomplish this are varied but include such blockbusters as poisoned websites and URLs embedded in email. Once the website is processed the exploit kicks off and things tend to go downhill from there. The most common item abused in your web browser is its ability to process scripts (especially JavaScript). Now Microsoft says they have a way to knock out as much as 45% of exploit attempts related to JavaScript and WebAssembly when using their Chromium based Edge browser.

Published in Security Talk