DecryptedTech

Monday03 October 2022

Displaying items by tag: Malware

Point of Sale Terminals are a new target for malicious individuals. At least this is a trend that many security researchers are seeing over the last few months. These systems can be a treasure trove of information for someone looking to make some quick money. On top of that most are designed with simple and generic logons to make use easier. This is a common flaw with many Windows based POS systems, yet the trend continues.

Published in News
Tuesday, 08 July 2014 16:19

Macro Viruses Making a Comeback

In the mid-late 1990s the computer world was rocked by a new plague that spread very quickly through most Windows PCs that were running any form of Microsoft Office. This was the Macro virus and there were plenty of examples of these nasty little bits of Microsoft enabled code were written in a form of Visual Basic called VBA (Visual Basic for Applications). Think of VBA as a stripped down version of the more powerful programing languages.

Published in News

Our first bit of news this morning is a piece about the SEA (Syrian Electronic Army) hacking into an ad plug-in (widget) on the Reuters new page that allowed them to redirect readers to new landing pages. Now, while the hack is serious, at the time of this writing it does not appear there was any additional payload pushed out to end users. All that happened was readers looking for news stories were redirected to a new page that slammed western media.

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Microsoft is joining the ranks of Symantec and McAfee in a very special group. This is a group of companies whose anti-malware products can be/have been attacked directly. According to a security update Microsoft says that a specifically crafted file can stop the service from working until manually removed.

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Remember when we told you about the first ransomware for Android? No? Oh ok so let’s give you a quick background. Not that long ago some enterprising person came up with a way to use the locking portion of Find my iPhone to lock a number of iPhones in Australia. This started a number of rumors about the spread of this new threat to the iPhone including one that claimed iCloud had been hacked. In the end the number of locked phones was much smaller than reported and the users were able to get their phones back without paying out the relatively small ransom.

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Nothing makes a Friday fun like hearing about a brand new form of Malware. Well that is what we have for you on today. It seems that an RSA researcher was picking around the darker places on the Internet and stumbled upon a new bit of malware that, if real, could be a serious problem in the near future. RSA researcher Eli Marcus is calling the new malware Pandemiya and claims that it is 25,000 lines of previously unused code.

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Imagine opening up a webpage when suddenly you see a notice saying all of your files have been locked. You have a limited amount of time to send a ransom or you will lose all of your data. This is what many people faced when the CryptoLocker Malware hit the PC world by surprise. Even now with many command and control servers down this threat still looms out there. Now imagine that instead of your PC it was your phone. The number of people that actually backup their phones in any real way is very small. A bit of malware like this could be disastrous to some.

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Whenever a new game hits the streets you can bet there will be a less-than-legal copy either right before, or right after. This was the case with the new game "Watch Dogs. Shortly before the retail release there were multiple copies available from different sources. One of the most popular sources was BitTorrent. Sadly, someone decided to taint that version with a bitcoin mining utility.

Published in Editorials

Malware and breaches are inevitable. Anyone that has been in security knows that this is a simple fact. Every day there are hundreds of attempted (and successful) attacks executed against businesses, consumers, and the government. These attacks have been traditionally met with an incident-response thought process. IT departments monitor their networks for suspicious activity and respond when/if they find someone who is either attempting to or actually has broken in. Sadly, this is probably not the best way to handle security.

Published in Editorials

Linksys has always had a name as a cost effective product for the consumer and even for small business. In the industry they have also been known to have some security issues. Not that long ago it was reported that a CGI script flaw in many of their E series routers allowed someone to bypass the requirement for admin credentials and gain unrestricted access to these products. Is if to add insult to injury malware has been identified in the wild that exploits the vulnerability.

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