DecryptedTech

Thursday11 August 2022

Displaying items by tag: Malware

It looks like the group behind Trickbot, the Swiss Army Knife of Malware as service for Windows is shutting down the framework and infrastructure behind the “solution”. According to research groups that have been tracking the campaign the disappearance there are several factors that have led up to this. One of the most recent changes appears to be a shift in efforts to a new malware format and potentially being “acquired” by another malware operator.

Published in Security Talk

It seems that there are still some MS SQL servers that are not only exposed to the open internet but are also still using weak passwords. When this is combined with vulnerabilities and the lack of other security controls and monitoring, it allows threat actors to compromise them. This is the case in a recently observed campaign where the attackers are targeting exposed MS SQL servers and injecting Cobalt Strike.

Published in Security Talk

Google has a bit of an issue with malware present in their Play Store as there are reports of another banking trojan targeting users of European banks. Currently, the malware called Xenomorph may have infected as many as 50,000 devices across 56 Banks, all though a malicious app located in the Google Play Store.

Published in Security Talk

There is an old saying that say, what someone can lock, someone else can unlock. This is usually used regarding attackers getting into a network or compromising protected data. It is not often applied to security researchers unlocking information encrypted by a major ransomware threat group. However, this is exactly what has happened as researchers at Kookmin University in South Korea say they have utilized a flaw in the encryption method used by Hive Ransomware to find a way to unlock it.

Published in Security Talk

Researchers have identified Trickbot in use in campaigns targeting several financial institutions. These groups along with a few tech companies thrown in a predominantly in the US and appear to be using an evolved version of the malware to get in and avoid detection by legacy anti-malware (signature based). It is usually part of a targeted spearphishing campaign where poisoned office documents are either contain links to malicious websites or can contain HTA code to execute a PowerShell command to download the second stage of the malware.

Published in Security Talk

The shift to services like AWS, GCP and more have meant that many organizations are also making a shift away from the Microsoft Windows platform and moving to a Linux centric environment and while this is a good move for the most part, it has left many open to exploit due to improper configurations and a lack of proper security tools to protect their environments.

Published in Security Talk

UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) was designed to replace the old and outdated BIOS (Baic Input Output System). The older BIOS setup was slow and not very secure. It gave attackers several entry points for infection and persistence at that level. The older BIOS standard was also susceptible to attack and compromise (think the Chernobyl BIOS virus). Something new needed to be put in place to help speed things up and help account for more complex hardware and software. Hence the UEFI was born.

Published in Security Talk

The concept of the app as opposed to the application is one of those nuanced distinctions that miss many people. When it comes to a mobile device an app is a bundle that that allows the installation of an application and its dependencies like an Android APK or Linux installer package. On Windows this has been a foreign concept as the thick application installer has been the defacto for so long. The .exe and .msi application is just how things get done. With the launch of Windows 8 and the “Microsoft Store” the app came to Windows.

Published in Security Talk

Back in the late 90s’ the first macro viruses appeared on the scene. The leveraged a feature of Microsoft Office that allowed a malware developer to execute programmed instructions via the office interface. This new option opened a lot of avenues for inserting a malicious payload on to a target system. Now some 20+ years later Microsoft is finally really doing something about this hole in their Office product. The are blocking all downloaded/external macros by default.

Published in Security Talk

The Go Programing Language (Go or Golang) was developed back in 2007 by a few engineers who were working at Google at the time. Go was launched in 2009 as an open-source programing language and it is primarily used in Google’s own production systems. It has been described as Python meets C and has syntax similarities with C and procedural similarities with Python (dynamic-typing etc.). So, you end up with a language that has quickness, security, and structure of a compiled programing language along with the development speed and simplicity of a dynamic language.

Published in Security Talk
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